Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-ar1

Forming adjectives.

[Latin adjectival ending -aris.]

Latin word stems that ended in l employed -aris to make their adjectives rather than -alis, the source of our -al1 suffix. As a result, the majority of adjectives in -ar in English have l or ul before the suffix, such as angular, circular, familiar, globular, jocular, polar, regular, similar, singular, and vulgar (see also -ule). Other English adjectives derived from Latin words ending in -aris include columnar, linear, lumbar, lunar, planar, and stellar. Some English adjectives have been formed using -ar that do not have Latin originals in -aris, often being based instead on Latin nouns in -um: curricular, granular, molecular, nuclear, scapular. See also -ary2.

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