Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-ar2

Forming nouns.

[Latin words ending in -aris, -arius, -arium, or -are, or Old French words ending in -aire or -ier.]

Examples from Latin include altar, bursar, cellar, exemplar, mortar, scholar, and vicar. Examples from Old French include burglar, collar, pillar, poplar, and vinegar. For a few nouns this ending is a variant of -er (see -er1) or -or (see -or1 and -or2), changed by an accident of spelling history: liar, beggar. Other nouns have this ending by chance, often through an origin in some other language: sugar (from Arabic), guitar (Greek), briar (Old English), fulmar (Old Norse), jaguar (Tupi-Guarani). Others, such as sonar and radar, are acronyms. See also -aire and -ary1.

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