Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-arious

Connected with; pertaining to.

[Originally from Latin adjectives ending in -arius.]

In the same way that many Latin words ending in -us arrived in English through French with the ending changed to -ous, some of those in -arius changed to -arious (others took on the endings -arian or -ary2 instead).

Words in -arious are adjectives. Some common examples are gregarious (Latin greg-, grex, a flock or herd), fond of company or sociable; precarious (Latin prex, prec-, prayer), uncertain or insecure; nefarious (Latin nefas, nefar-, wrong), wicked or criminal; vicarious (Latin vicarius, substitute), of something experienced through the feelings or actions of another person; and various (Latin varius, changing or diverse).

This suffix has never been active in English; examples that appear to exist have actually been formed by attaching -ous (or its variant -ious) to a word stem containing -ar-: burglarious, hilarious, uproarious.

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