Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

Anglo-

English or British; English or British and …

[Latin Anglus, English.]

The prefix has several meanings depending on context that often reflect a confusion between England and Britain. Terms often have multiple senses resulting from historical links or sensitivities.

It is frequently used in hyphenated compounds linking England or Britain to another group or nationality: Anglo-American can refer to a American citizen of English origin, or relationships between the United States and Britain; Anglo-Irish can indicate a link between Britain and Ireland, specifically to the Republic of Ireland (as in the Anglo-Irish Agreement of 1995), or to a person of English descent born or resident in Ireland (or one of mixed English and Irish parentage), or to the English language as used in Ireland. Anglo-Saxon refers to the Germanic inhabitants of England between the fifth century and the Norman Conquest (and in modern times to individuals of English descent).

Other words containing the prefix include Anglomania, excessive admiration for English customs; Anglophobia, a hatred or fear of England or Britain; Anglocentric, centred on or considered in terms of England or Britain. An anglophone is an English-speaking person, or refers to the speaking of English.

Visit Michael Quinion’s World Wide Words site for 2000+ articles on English!

Copyright © Michael Quinion 2008–. All rights reserved. Page last updated 23 September 2008.
Your comments are very welcome.