Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

apo-

Away from; separate from.

[Greek apo, off, from, or away.]

The prefix often occurs in words borrowed from Greek, as in apostasy (Greek apostasis, defection), the abandonment or renunciation of a religious or political belief or principle; apostrophe, a mark to show where one or more letters have been missed out (Greek strephein, to turn, so a mark of turning away, an elision); apostle (Greek apostolos, messenger); apoplexy (from plēssein, to strike, hence ‘struck down’).

A number of coinages appear in modern scientific English: apoptosis (Greek ptōsis, falling or a fall, hence a falling away or decay), the death of cells which occurs as a normal part of an organism's development; apomixis (Greek mixis, mingling), asexual reproduction in plants; and apocarpous (Greek karpos, fruit), of a flower or fruit that has its carpels separate.

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