Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

brom(o)-

Bromine.

[The first part of English bromine plus -o-.]

The form is widely employed in chemistry to mark a bromine derivative of a compound, as in bromoacetone, bromobenzene, and bromoform, the bromine analogue of chloroform. Bromides are compounds of bromine with another element or group, while bromates are salts of bromic acid, HBrO3. To brominate a chemical compound is to combine bromine with it.

In medicine, bromocriptine, a bromine-containing synthetic analogue of the ergot alkaloids, is used in the treatment of Parkinsonism and other conditions; bromsulphthalein (also called sulphobromophthalein) is a blue dye used in tests of liver function; brompheniramine is an antihistamine.

The element's name derives from Greek brōmos, a stink, because it has a heavy, irritating smell. The same root occurs in bromhidrosis, the secretion of foul-smelling sweat, body odour.

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