Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

circum-

Around or about.

[Latin circum, around.]

Many words in this form have been adopted, usually in a figurative sense, from Latin words already containing it: to circumvent (Latin venire, to come) is to avoid or find a way around some obstacle; to be circumspect (Latin specere, to look) is to be wary or careful; circumscribe (Latin scribere, write) can still literally mean to draw a line round something, but usually means to restrict within limits.

To circumnavigate the world is to travel all the way round it; a circumcircle is a circle that touches all the vertices of a geometrical figure. Several adjectives denote moving around a celestial body, such as circumsolar (the Sun) and circumlunar (the Moon); circumpolar refers to moving around the pole, especially a circumpolar star, one that never sets.

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