Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

com- Also co-, col-, con- and cor-.

Joint; mutual.

[Latin cum, with.]

Which form is used depends on the initial letter of the stem: com- is usual before b, m, and p, some vowels, and sometimes f (combine, commerce, compact, comestible, comfort); co- before vowels, h, and gn (coerce, cohabit, cognate); col- before l (collect); cor- before r (correct); and con- before other consonants (concede, connect, contain). Many words of these types were created in Latin and brought over into English; in many of them the form has the effect of intensifying the root word. The form co- often makes a hyphenated pair with another English word, indicating some activity taken in common or jointly: co-author, co-driver, co-education, co-founder, co-pilot, co-producer, co-purchaser.

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