Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

cyclo-

A circle, circular movement, or regular repetition.

[Either Greek kuklos, circle, or English cycle or cyclic.]

Words that include the idea of a circle include cyclorama, originally a large cylindrical picture designed to be viewed from inside, today usually a curved backdrop in a theatre, and cyclostome, an eel-like animal with a circular sucking mouth, such as a lamprey.

Other examples suggest circular movement: a cycloid is a curve marked out by a point on a circle rolling along a straight line, such as a point on a moving vehicle wheel; a cyclotron is a circular device for accelerating atomic and subatomic particles. A few compounds refer to a cyclic recurring condition, as in cyclothymia, a mental state in which the sufferer swings repeatedly between depression and elation.

In chemistry, the form marks a compound that contains a closed chain or ring of carbon atoms, as in cyclohexane, a colourless liquid used as a paint solvent. In medicine, cyclosporin (Greek spora, spore), a cyclic peptide derived from a fungus, is used to prevent rejection of grafts.

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