Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-delic Also -delia.

Of attitudes or activities relating to a given type of experience.

[Greek dēlos, clear, manifest, plus -ia.]

The first example, from the 1950s but especially linked to the sixties hippie era, was psychedelic (Greek psukhē, breath, life, soul), relating to or denoting drugs (especially LSD) that produce hallucinations and apparent expansion of consciousness. On its model, a few others have been created, though none has achieved great popularity and the meaning of the ending is variable and often imprecise: funkadelic, relating to the collective experience of making and playing funk music; cyberdelic, of a Northern Californian subculture that attempts to reconcile the information revolution with sixties counterculture. Other, more transient, examples are dancedelic and sampladelic (centred on sampled musical sounds), and shagadelic (British vulgar slang shag, have sexual intercourse with), popularized by the Mike Myers film Austin Powers: the Spy Who Shagged Me. Related nouns are formed using -delia (psychodelia, cyberdelia, funkadelia).

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