Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

deuter(o)- Sometimes deuto-.

Second; secondary.

[Greek deuteros, second.]

Examples where the form means ‘second’ include deuteragonist (Greek agōnistēs, actor), the person second in importance to the protagonist in a drama; Deuteronomy (Greek nomos law), the fifth book of the Old Testament, so named because it contains a repetition of the decalogue and the laws given in Exodus; and deuterium, a stable second isotope of hydrogen.

The idea of something secondary appears in deuterocanonical, of sacred books or literary works that form a secondary canon; and deuterostome (Greek stoma, mouth), an organism, such as a starfish, whose mouth develops from a secondary embryonic opening.

Deuto- is now uncommon, appearing for example in deutoplasm, sometimes used for the yolk of an egg.

Visit Michael Quinion’s World Wide Words site for 2000+ articles on English!

Copyright © Michael Quinion 2008–. All rights reserved. Page last updated 23 September 2008.
Your comments and suggestions on the site are very welcome.