Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

dys-

Bad; difficult.

[Greek dus-, hard, bad.]

This form appears most commonly in medical terms, such as dyspepsia (Greek duspeptos, difficult to digest), indigestion; dysphagia (Greek phagein, eat), difficulty or discomfort in swallowing, as a symptom of disease; dyslexia (Greek lexis, speech, through a confusion with Latin legere, to read), a general term for disorders that involve difficulty in learning to read or interpret words, letters, and other symbols.

A dysphemism (Greek phēmē, speaking) is a derogatory or unpleasant term used instead of a pleasant or neutral one, the opposite of euphemism; a dystopia (Greek topos, place) is an imagined place or state in which everything is unpleasant or bad, the opposite of utopia; dysfunctional refers to something not operating normally or properly, or someone unable to deal adequately with normal social relations; the chemical element dysprosium (see -ium) was so named from the related Greek dusprositos, hard to get at.

Its opposite is eu-.

Visit Michael Quinion’s World Wide Words site for 2000+ articles on English!

Copyright © Michael Quinion 2008–. All rights reserved. Page last updated 23 September 2008.
Your comments and suggestions on the site are very welcome.