Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-ed1

Having; possessing; affected by; characteristic of.

[Old English -ede.]

These adjectives are formed from nouns; a few examples of a large group are: cultured, diseased, flowered, grained, hooded, jagged, jaundiced, knotted, leisured, matted, ragged, ridged, scented, talented, toothed. In principle, most nouns can add -ed in this way to create new adjectives: architected, liposuctioned, polymered, touristed.

This construction is common with hyphenated phrases consisting either of an adjective and a noun or a pair of nouns: able-bodied, absent-minded, barrel-chested, deep-rooted, high-spirited, oil-fired, rose-tinted, semi-skimmed, well-timed.

For adjectives in -ed formed from verbs, see the next entry.

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