Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-eme Also -emic.

Linguistic units that are in systemic contrast with one other.

[The ending of phoneme.]

A phoneme (Greek phōnēma, sound, speech) is one of the perceptually distinct units of sound in a language that distinguish one word from another. On its model, a number of other terms have been formed, of which examples include morpheme (Greek morphē, form), a meaningful unit that cannot be further divided; lexeme (Greek lexis, word), a basic unit of language consisting of one word or several words, the elements of which do not separately convey the meaning of the whole; grapheme (Greek graphē, writing), a minimal unit in a writing system, consisting of one or more symbols serving to represent a phoneme. Adjectives are formed in -emic: morphemic, phonemic. Some other words end in -eme through accidents of spelling: blaspheme, extreme, raceme, supreme, trireme.

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