Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-ene2

An inhabitant.

[Greek -ēnos.]

Examples include: Cairene, an inhabitant of Cairo; Hellene, of Greece (Greek Hellēn, a Greek); Nazarene, of Nazareth, referring specially to Christ or, figuratively, to Christians (Greek Nazarēnos, from Nazaret, Nazareth); Damascene, of Damascus. Most examples can also be adjectives referring to the place or the inhabitant. A Gadarene is literally an inhabitant of Gadara, but is usually an adjective referring to a headlong or potentially disastrous rush to do something, from the Gospel story of the Gadarene swine (New Testament Greek Gadarēnos).

Other words ending in -ene come from a variety of sources: gangrene from Greek gangraina and epicene from Greek epikoinos (based on koinos, common); contravene, intervene, and supervene all derive from Latin venire, come; obscene comes from Latin obscaenus, ill-omened or abominable.

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