Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-er2

Forming the comparative of some adjectives and adverbs.

[Old English suffix -ra (adjectival), -or (adverbial), of Germanic origin.]

The adjectives that make their comparatives with -er are generally those of one syllable: brighter, greater, harder, older, richer, tighter. Most of those with two syllables that end in -le, -er or -ow also add -er, as do those in -y or -ly (when the y changes to an i): simpler, cleverer, narrower, angrier, livelier. Most adjectives of two syllables or more form their comparatives with more instead.

A few adverbs are identical in form to the adjectives from which they derive, and follow the same rules for forming comparatives: he runs faster, I'll see you later. A few others, without corresponding adjectives, do the same: sooner, farther/further.

For the superlative form, see -est1.

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