Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

ep(i)-

Upon; above; in addition.

[Greek epi, upon, near to, in addition.]

A number of English words have been introduced from Greek, often via Latin and French, with the prefix already attached: epidemic (Greek epidēmia, prevalence of disease, from dēmos, the people) plus epidemiology and related terms; epilepsy (Greek epilambanein, seize or attack, from lambanein, take hold of); epidermis (Greek derma, skin), the outer layer of cells covering an organism; an epitaph is literally something on a tomb (Greek taphos, tomb); an epigram (Greek epigramma, from gramma, a thing written) is a pithy saying or remark expressing an idea in a clever and amusing way.

Examples coined in English using the prefix include epidural (Latin dura, hard), relating to an anaesthetic introduced into the space around the dura mater of the spinal cord; epiphenomenon, a secondary effect or by-product; and epiphyte (Greek phuton, plant), a plant that grows on another plant.

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