Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

equi-

Equal; equally.

[Latin aequi-, from aequus, equal.]

Two things that are equiangular have equal angles; though it has other meanings, the key sense of equity is equality, fairness, and impartiality; an equipoise is a balance of forces or interests.

Other examples come from Latin words with the prefix already attached: equilateral (Latin aequilaterus, equal-sided, from latus, later-, side), having all its sides the same length; equilibrium (Latin aequilibrium, from libra, balance), a state in which opposing forces or influences are balanced; equinox (aequinoctium, from nox, noct-, night), the dates on which day and night are of equal length.

However, equine and its relatives come from Latin equus, horse, as does equisetum, a plant of a genus that comprises the horsetails; equip is probably from Old Norse skipa, to man a ship.

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