Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-fer

Bearing or carrying.

[Latin ferre, to carry or bear.]

Nouns include conifer (Latin conus, cone, so cone-bearing); crucifer (Latin crux, cruc-, a cross), a type of plant having four petals arranged in the shape of a cross; umbellifer (Latin umbella, parasol, from the shape of the flowers), a plant of the parsley family. A rare example created in English is aquifer (Latin aqua, water, so ‘water-bearing’), a body of permeable rock that can contain or transmit groundwater.

Verbs in -fer are usually figurative: transfer (from trans, across, so literally to carry across); defer and differ (both from Latin dis-, apart); and confer (Latin con-, together).

The form is not active in the language.

Some words derive from accidents of spelling: duffer, an incompetent or stupid person, is from Scots dowfart, a stupid person; gaffer, a person in charge of others, is probably a contraction of godfather or grandfather. Others are from stems ending in f that contain the suffix -er1 (as in golfer from golf).

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