Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

gymn(o)-

Bare or naked.

[Greek gumnos, naked.]

In classical Greece, a gumnasion was a place where young men exercised naked, from which English has derived gymnasium and its relatives gymnast, gymnastic, and gymnastics. The gymnosophists (literally, naked wise men, from Greek sophistēs, a teacher of philosophy) were members of an ancient Hindu sect, known for ascetic behaviour that included wearing few clothes. The prefix appears in a number of biological and botanical terms, including gymnosperm for a class of plants—including conifers, cycads, and the ginkgo—whose seeds are not protected by an ovary or fruit.

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