Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

haplo-

Single or simple.

[Greek haploos, single.]

In genetics, a haploid cell is one that has only a single set of unpaired chromosomes, for example a sperm or egg cell in humans. Organisms which are haplodiploid have females which develop from fertilized (diploid) eggs and males from unfertilized (haploid) ones. See also diplo-.

In writing, haplography is the inadvertent omission of a repeated letter or letters (for example, writing philogy instead of philology, or Missippi for Mississippi); in speech, haplology is a similar omission of a sound or syllable (for example, saying probly when probably is meant).

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