Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-ite2 Also -it.

Forming adjectives, nouns, and verbs.

[Latin -itus, past participle of verbs ending in -ere and -ire.]

Such words have nothing in common except their source. Adjectives include composite, contrite, definite, erudite, exquisite, favourite, finite, opposite, polite, and requisite. Some of these can also be nouns, and a few others are wholly or mainly so: appetite, requisite. Others are verbs: expedite, ignite, unite. Some have lost the final e: circuit, elicit, implicit, solicit.

By no means all words in -ite have this Latin origin. Most short words, such as smite and write, are of Germanic origin; hypocrite and parasite are from Greek; others, such as respite and satellite, come from different Latin sources.

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