Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-kin Also -kins.

Forming diminutive nouns.

[Middle Dutch -kijn, -ken, Middle Low German -kīn.]

A manikin, a person who is very small, derives from Dutch manneken, diminutive of man (the store dummy called a mannequin is the French spelling of the same word); a bodkin, a thick, blunt needle with a large eye, is historically most probably a small bod, an Irish word for a dagger; gherkin is a diminutive of a Dutch word for a cucumber; larrikin, an Australian term for a boisterous, often badly behaved young man, is possibly a diminutive of the given name Larry; napkin is a diminutive of Old French nappe, tablecloth. Words in -kins express endearment, as in babykins, bunnykins, mouseykins.

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