Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-logue In the US usually -log.

A type of communication or debate.

[French -logue, from Greek -logos, -logon, word or speech.]

Examples include monologue (Greek monos, alone), a long speech by one actor, or a one by someone monopolising a conversation; dialogue (Greek dia, through), a conversation between two or more people or groups, often to resolve some problem; travelogue, a film, book, or illustrated lecture describing travels; epilogue (Greek epi, in addition), a concluding part to a book or play; Decalogue is another name for the Ten Commandments in Christian theology.

In catalogue (Greek katalogos, from katalegein, pick out or enrol), it has the rare sense of a compilation; a few modern formations are based on it, including magalogue, a blend of magazine and catalogue, a promotional catalogue or brochure designed to resemble a high-quality magazine.

Rarely, the ending is equivalent to -logist: ideologue.

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