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Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-mania Also -maniac and -mane.

Mental abnormality or obsession; extreme enthusiasm or admiration.

[Greek mania, madness.]

The ending is common in psychiatry to name various kinds of mental problems (megalomania, nymphomania) as is mania itself as a general term. For more details and examples, see the list below.

It is also used more loosely for an enthusiasm such that those showing it seem almost unbalanced; examples here include Beatlemania, balletomania, and Anglomania (excessive admiration of English customs). In this sense, the ending is frequently used in journalism to create words for short-term purposes, as in Euro-mania, enthusiasm for European integration regarded as excessive, or lotterymania, an extreme desire to take part in lotteries.

Someone exhibiting such characteristics, in either sense, can be described by a word ending in -maniac (dipsomaniac, megalomaniac, nymphomaniac), or, more rarely, by one ending in -mane, of which the only common example is balletomane.

Examples that seem to contain the ending through accidents of spelling include leishmania, a single-celled parasitic protozoan (from the proper name Leishman), and some names of countries: Romania, Tasmania.

Examples of words in -mania
Word origins are from Greek unless otherwise stated.

Beatlemania frenzied enthusiasm for the 1960s pop group the Beatlesbibliomania, passionate enthusiasm for collecting and possessing books biblion, book
egomania obsessive egotism or self-centredness Latin ego, I
erotomania excessive sexual desire erōs, erōt-, sexual love
hypomania a mild form of mania, marked by elation and hyperactivity hupo, under
kleptomania a recurrent urge to steal kleptēs, thief
megalomania obsession with the exercise of power, especially in the domination of others megas, megal-, great
metromania a mania for writing poetry metron, metre
monomania exaggerated or obsessive enthusiasm for or preoccupation with one thing monos, alone
nymphomania uncontrollable or excessive sexual desire in a woman Latin nympha, nymph
pyromania an obsessive desire to set fire to things pur, fire
trichotillomania a compulsive desire to pull out one's hair thrix, trikho-, hair, plus tillesthai, to pull out
tulipomania a craze for tulips, especially that in Holland in the seventeenth century English tulip

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