Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-mer Also -mere, -meric, and -merous.

Part or segment.

[Greek meros, part.]

Terms in -mer often denote substances whose molecules are built up from a number of identical simpler molecules, a polymer (Greek polloi, many), each of the component parts of which is a monomer (Greek monos, alone). The number of units can be given by a prefix: dimer, a molecule formed from two identical smaller molecules; trimer, three; and so on. An oligomer (Greek oligoi, few) has relatively few such units. Some refer to molecules that are closely related: isomers (Greek isos, equal) are compounds with the same formula but different arrangements of atoms and different properties; enantiomers (Greek enantios, opposite), are pairs of molecules that are mirror images of each other.

Related adjectives are formed in -meric: dimeric, isomeric, polymeric. Adjectives formed in -merous refer to an organism made up of a given number of parts: heptamerous (Greek hepta, seven), having parts arranged in groups of seven; polymerous, having or consisting of many parts; isomerous, having or composed of parts that are similar in number or position.

Terms in -mere refer to elements of biological structures, as in telomere (Greek telos, end), a compound structure at the end of a chromosome; and blastomere (Greek blastos, germ, sprout), a cell formed by cleavage of a fertilized ovum. Related adjectives here are formed in -meric: centromeric, telomeric.

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