Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

morph(o)-

Form or character.

[Greek morphē, form.]

A few examples exist in technical contexts, such as morphology, the study of the forms of things, such as living organisms or words, in particular inflected forms; morphogenesis, the origin and development of the forms of organisms, or the formation of landforms or other structures; morphallaxis (Greek allaxis, exchange), regeneration by the transformation of existing body tissues.

Morph also exists as a standalone noun (each of several variant forms of an animal or plant, or of a word) and as a verb (to change smoothly from one image to another by small steps using computer animation techniques).

In linguistics, morpho- refers to morphemes, meaningful units of a language that cannot be further divided, as in morphophoneme, one of the variant phonemes which belong to the same morpheme, and morphosyntactic, involving both morphology and syntax.

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