Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

myel(o)-

Bone marrow; the spinal cord.

[Greek muelos, marrow.]

Terms that refer to bone marrow include myeloma, a malignant tumour of it; myelofibrosis, the replacement of bone marrow by fibrous tissue in some diseases; myelocyte, a cell of the bone marrow that develops into a granulocyte, a type of white blood cell; and myelin, a whitish insulating sheath around many nerve fibres, so named because it resembles marrow.

Myelo- came to refer to the spinal cord because of the concentration of grey matter and nerve fibres associated with it. Examples include myelitis, inflammation of the spinal cord; myelopathy (Greek patheia, suffering), a disease of it; and myelography, x-ray examination of the spinal canal inside the cord by injecting a radio-opaque substance into it.

The adjective myeloid can refer either to bone marrow or to the spinal cord.

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