Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

neur(o)-

Nerves or the nervous system.

[Greek neuron, nerve, sinew, tendon.]

This form appears widely in medicine and related fields. Neuralgia (Greek algos, pain) is a pain along the course of a nerve, often in the head or face; neurasthenia is an ill-defined medical condition characterized by lassitude, headache, and irritability; the adjective neuromuscular refers to nerves and muscles. Neurology is the study of the anatomy, functions, and organic disorders of nerves and the nervous system. A neuron is a specialized cell transmitting nerve impulses; a neuroleptic drug tends to reduce nervous tension by depressing nerve functions. A neurosis in medical usage is a relatively mild mental illness that is not caused by organic disease, while in non-technical use it refers to excessive and irrational anxiety or obsession (adjective neurotic). The form appears in several compound terms for medical sub-specialities, such as neurophysiology and neuropharmacology. The usual adjective is neural.

Visit Michael Quinion’s World Wide Words site for 2000+ articles on English!

Copyright © Michael Quinion 2008–. All rights reserved. Page last updated 23 September 2008.
Your comments and suggestions on the site are very welcome.