Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-ode2

A conductor of electricity.

[Greek hodos, way.]

The ending was invented by William Whewell in 1834 when advising Michael Faraday on names for the conductors by which electricity enters or leaves a medium (originally a solution). He proposed cathode (Greek kata-, down) for the negatively charged pole by which electrons enter the medium, and anode (Greek ana, up) for the other. Faraday invented electrode from electric as a general term for either conductor. A set created later on their model describes thermionic valves with a given number of electrodes: diode, triode, tetrode, pentode; the first two now more usually refer to types of semiconductor device.

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