Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-oon

Forming nouns and derived verbs.

[Originally from French words having the final stressed syllable -on; sometimes via the equivalent Italian -one.]

Examples from French include bassoon (French basson); dragoon (French dragon, a type of musket, thought of as breathing fire like a dragon), now a member of any of several British cavalry regiments; pontoon (French ponton), a flat-bottomed boat used to support a temporary bridge or floating landing stage. Examples from Italian include lagoon (Italian, and Spanish, laguna) and cartoon (Italian cartone). Some can be either nouns or verbs: cocoon, lampoon. The only common word formed in English using this ending is spitoon.

A few words come from other languages and are unconnected: tycoon (Japanese taikun, great lord), monsoon (Portuguese monçäo, from Arabic mawsim, season), raccoon (Virginia Algonquian aroughcun).

See also -zoon.

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