Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-orama Also -(r)ama.

A display or spectacle.

[The final element of panorama or cyclorama.]

Panorama was invented about 1789 by the Irish painter Robert Barker to describe a very large cylindrical landscape painting which one could stand inside. He derived it from Greek pan, all, plus horama, view. It became famous, and a fashion developed of creating imitative terms for similar displays (cyclorama, cosmorama, georama, diorama). Cyclorama has survived to mean an illuminated stage backcloth, diorama is now usually a model representing a scene with three-dimensional figures. Futurama was an exhibit at the New York World's Fair in 1939. The introduction of the film projection system Cinerama in the 1950s sparked off a second series of imitations, this time of shorter-lived terms to indicate some spectacle. Their heyday was the 1960s and 1970s, but the ending has survived. Examples are sensorama, Scout-O-Rama (used in the US for large annual Scout events), and odourama and smellorama (adding scents to films, museum exhibits, and other media).

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