Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-our

Forming nouns.

[Derived from various sources.]

For the most part, words in -our are variants of those in -or (see -or1 and -or2). However, there are some that derive from a variety of other sources, such as endeavour (late Middle English, in the sense ‘exert oneself’; from the phrase put oneself in devoir, do one's utmost), harbour (Old English herebeorg, shelter, refuge), neighbour (Old English, from nēah, near, plus gebūr, inhabitant, peasant, farmer), and parlour (Anglo-Norman French parlur, place for speaking, from Latin parlare, speak). All these are usually written -or in American English.

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