Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

oo- Also oö-.

An egg or ovum.

[Greek ōion, egg.]

Terms are mainly specialist ones in biology, such as oocyte (Greek kutos, vessel), a cell in an ovary which may undergo meiotic division to form an ovum; oogamous (Greek gonos, generation), relating to or denoting reproduction by the union of mobile male and immobile female gametes; ootheca (Greek thēkē, receptacle), the egg case of cockroaches, mantises, and related insects. However, it also occurs in geology in reference to egg-shaped masses, as in oolite (Greek lithos, stone), a limestone consisting of a mass of rounded grains (ooliths) made up of concentric layers. The form may occasionally be seen written with a dieresis (oö-) to indicate that the two vowels are pronounced separately: oögamous, oölite. See also ovi-.

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