Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

organo-

Bodily organs; organic chemical compounds.

[Either Greek organon, organ, or English organic.]

Examples relating to organs include organoleptic (Greek lēptikos, disposed to take), involving the use of the sense organs; organogenesis, the production and development of the organs of an animal or plant; and organotherapy, the treatment of disease with extracts from animal organs, especially glands.

In chemistry, the prefix is used to make names for groups of organic compounds which contain a particular element or group, frequently a metal or other inorganic radical: organochlorine, any of a large group of pesticides and other synthetic organic compounds containing chlorine; organophosphorus, denoting synthetic organic compounds containing phosphorus, especially pesticides and nerve gases; an organometallic compound contains a metal atom bonded to an organic group or groups.

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