Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-phasia Also -phasic.

Speech disorder.

[Greek phanai, to speak.]

Psychologists use these terms for speech disorders that are mainly caused by brain damage. Examples are aphasia (Greek a-, not), inability, or impaired ability, to understand or produce speech; dysphasia (Greek dus-, difficult), deficiency in the generation of speech, and sometimes also in its comprehension; paraphasia (Greek para, amiss, irregular), jumbling of words and production of meaningless sentences.

Associated adjectives are formed in -phasic: aphasic, dysphasic. However, some in that ending derive instead from nouns ending in -phase, for example biphasic, having two phases, or polyphasic, consisting of or occurring in a number of separate stages.

Visit Michael Quinion’s World Wide Words site for 2000+ articles on English!

Copyright © Michael Quinion 2008–. All rights reserved. Page last updated 23 September 2008.
Your comments and suggestions on the site are very welcome.