Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-plex

Having a given number of parts or units.

[Latin plicare, to fold.]

This ending can refer to numerical multiples: duplex, something having two parts; multiplex, consisting of many elements in a complex relationship; simplex (Latin, literally ‘single’, variant of simplus, simple), composed of or characterized by a single part or structure; googolplex, equivalent to ten raised to the power of a googol, itself an invented word meaning ten raised to the power of a hundred (10100).

In addition, duplex can mean a residential building divided into two apartments, or two houses with a common wall (semi-detached in British usage), and a multiplex can be a cinema with several separate screens. This meaning, of a group of similar buildings or facilities on the same site, derives from one sense of complex, which comes from the same Latin stem.

Other examples—particularly common in North America—are triplex, a building divided into three self-contained residences; fourplex (also quadraplex and quadriplex), a building divided into four such residences; Cineplex, a trade name for a cinema with several separate screens; and, by extension, metroplex, a very large metropolitan area, especially one which is an aggregation of two or more cities. Several of these were originally blends (Cineplex from cinema and complex, for example), but -plex seems now to be established as a combining form in this sense.

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