Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

pinn(i)- Also pinnati-.

Wings, fins, or feathers.

[Latin pinna, penna, wing, fin, feather.]

A leaf that is pinnate has leaflets arranged on either side of the stem, typically in pairs opposite each other, rather like the barbs of a feather; one that is pinnatifid (Latin fid-, cleft) is pinnately divided, but not all the way down to the central axis, as opposed to a pinnatisect one, which is so divided; a pinniped (Latin pes, ped-, foot) is a member of a group of aquatic mammals—the seals, sea lions, and walrus—which have flipper-like limbs. Pinna itself is variously used in technical English to refer to the external part of the ear in humans and other mammals (figuratively the ‘wing’ of the ear), or a primary division of a pinnate leaf, or one of a number of animal structures resembling fins or wings.

Visit Michael Quinion’s World Wide Words site for 2000+ articles on English!

Copyright © Michael Quinion 2008–. All rights reserved. Page last updated 23 September 2008.
Your comments and suggestions on the site are very welcome.