Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

sur-

Over, above, beyond; additional.

[French sur, from Latin super.]

Few words have been formed in English using this prefix, most examples having entered the language from French with it already attached. Examples are surcharge, an additional charge or payment, surface (from face), surmount, to overcome some difficulty or obstacle, surfeit, surpass, survive (Old French sourvivre, from Latin vivere, to live), surtax, and surrender (Old French rendre, from an alteration of Latin reddere, to give back). Though spelled differently, sirloin, indicating the choicer part of a loin of beef, came into English by the same route (its spelling may have been influenced by a story of an English king who facetiously knighted a roast joint of beef). Many words beginning surr- are examples instead of an assimilated form of sub-. See also super-.

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