Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

tellur(o)-

Tellurium; the earth.

[Latin tellus, tellur-, earth.]

The semi-metal tellurium was named by its discoverer, the German chemist Martin Klaproth (1743–1817), as a deliberate contrast to uranium (Greek ouranos, heavens), which he had discovered previously. Most terms in this form relate to tellurium: a telluride is a compound of divalent tellurium, analogous to a sulphide; tellurite is a salt of the anion TeO32-; the adjectives tellurous and telluric can refer respectively to tellurium with combining powers of four and six. However, a few words retain the original Latin sense of the earth: a tellurian is an inhabitant of the earth; telluric can also refer to the earth as a planet or to the soil; a tellurometer is a microwave long-distance surveying instrument.

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