Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

tri-

Three; having three.

[Latin tres, Greek treis, three.]

Some examples are triangle, literally ‘three-cornered’ (Latin angulus, corner); triathlon, an athletic contest consisting of three different events; tripod (Latin pous, pod-, foot), a three-legged stand for supporting a camera or other apparatus; trilingual, able to speak three languages (Latin lingua, tongue); tripartite (Latin partitus, divided), consisting of three parts; the fossil animal called a trilobite (Greek lobos, lobe) had a segmented hindpart divided longitudinally into three lobes; triplicate (Latin triplex, triplic-, threefold), refers to something existing in three copies or examples. The form is widely used in chemistry to indicate the presence of three atoms or groups of a given type: trichloroacetic acid, triiodothyronine, trisaccharide. See also trito-.

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