Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-ula Also -ular.

Forming diminutive nouns.

[Latin feminine ending -ula.]

Examples include auricula (diminutive of Latin auris, ear), an Alpine primula whose leaves supposedly resemble bears' ears; cannula (diminutive of Latin canna, reed), a thin tube inserted into a vein or body cavity during surgery; spatula (diminutive of Latin spatha, a broadsword), an implement with a broad, flat, blunt blade. However, peninsula derives from Latin insula, island; others come from a variety of sources.

Words ending in -ular are adjectives, derived from the Latin adjectival ending -ularis. They are sometimes related to diminutive nouns in -ule or -ula (fistular, globular, macular, molecular, pustular). Others are linked to a variety of English nouns in various endings with no diminutive sense (angular, irregular, muscular, oracular, perpendicular).

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