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Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

uran(o)-2

Uranium.

[The stem of English uranium plus -o-.]

The radioactive element uranium was named after the then newly discovered planet Uranus, whose name in turn was taken from that of the Greek god who was ruler of the universe, so it ultimately derives from the same stem as that in the previous entry. The uranyl cation is UO22+, present in some compounds of uranium; uranic compounds contain uranium with a combining power of six, while in uranous ones it has a combining power of four; uranophane (Greek -phanēs, appearing) is an ore of uranium.

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