Go to 'thermo-' entry Go to 'dino-' entry Go to 'chondro-' entry Go to 'aero-' entry Go to '-logy' entry Go to 'thaumato-' entry Go to 'nano-' entry Go to '-sophy' entry Go to 'bucco-' entry Go to '-ism' entry Go to '-lysis' entry Go to 'galacto-' entry Go to '-anthropy' entry Go to 'pneumo-' entry Go to '-ploitation' entry Go to '-lithic' entry Go to '-sepalous' entry Go to 'onco-' entry Go to '-parous' entry Go to 'dermato-' entry Go to 'multi-' entry Go to 'dodeca-' entry Go to '-zoon' entry Go to 'vermi-' entry Go to 'crystallo-' entry Go to 'biblio-' entry Go to 'eco-' entry Go to 'juxta-' entry Go to 'facio-' entry
Affixes: the building blocks of English
Affixes: the building blocks of English

-a2 Also -ata.

The plural of certain nouns of Latin or Greek origin.

[From the Latin or Greek neuter plural ending.]

Many nouns from Latin or Greek that end in -um or -on form their plurals in -a, as for example datum changes to data and phenomenon to phenomena. Such plurals are now often formed using -s instead.

A further group, mostly specialist words, whose singulars already end in -a, can form their plurals in -ata. Examples are lemma (plural lemmata), schema (schemata), stigma (stigmata), and trauma (traumata). Here, too, plurals in -s are now common.

The same plural form occurs in the scientific names of many classes of animals, such as Mammalia, Amphibia, Cetacea, Crustacea, Mollusca, and Protozoa (see also -acea and -ia).

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